Category Archives: Books

In Response: 30 of MY Favourite Fantasy Book Series

I saw this post via Facebook today, and it really bugged me. You don’t get to claim that things are the best of anything without some evidence to show this. Are they the 30 best selling fantasy series? Are they the 30 most reviewed fantasy series? Are they the 30 most awarded book fantasy series? What, in fact, are they the best at? Being mostly by men? Yeah, because only five of the 30 series mentioned here are by men. And even the ones by women? Not all fantasy (much as many of Anne McCaffrey’s Pern books have a fantasy feel to them, they are in fact science fiction…) So I decided to write my OWN list of fantasy book series.

I won’t claim them to be the “best” of anything, except being best reads I’ve loved over the years. Please note, these are only series I have read and loved over the past 25 years or so. I have not included anything I know to be amazing unless I have read it, I have not included anything I have personally published, and I’ve only noted one series per author (even though for many, they have several I enjoy). And as always, a disclaimer that if I did this exercise again on another day, it would probably be a different list… Here goes…

  1. Artefacts of Power series by Maggie Furey – I’m almost 100% certain these would not hold up to a critical reread nearly two decades after I first adored them, but I can’t bring myself to try. I loved them when I was young, and so they have their place here.
  2. Anita Blake series by Laurell K Hamilton – The first half dozen of these are amazing, and while I’ll acknowledge the quality devolved in the later books, they were still excellent at the time, and the first few still stand up today.
  3. Axis trilogy by Sara Douglass – Look, this really started it all for me, in my journey of discovering Australian fantasy writers, and Sara was a trailblazer with her work. These days I have issues with the way some things are presented, but when I first read them, and for several years after, these were astonishingly good.
  4. Black Jewels books by Anne Bishop – I ADORED this series when I discovered it and one of my big disappointments in life is that I didn’t get to the Australian SF convention she was a guest for. Still grab anything new by Bishop.
  5. Blackthorn & Grim by Juliet Marillier – No, this series isn’t yet complete but I don’t care; the first two books are excellent (as is all Marillier’s work) so I think I’m safe.
  6. Creature Court trilogy by Tansy Rayner Roberts – It’s not secret I love everything Tansy writes, but I loved what she did in the Creature Court world and they deserved the awards they received. Sadly, I don’t think the covers, while pretty, do the darkness and depths of the story justice.
  7. Damar books by Robin McKinley – I am definitely due a reread of this duology. Loved the world so much when I first read them, and feel the need to revisit.
  8. Daughter of Smoke and Bone trilogy (plus extras) by Laini Taylor – So much love for these books! Taylor writes beautiful characters and puts them in awful situations. Fantastic.
  9. Enchanted Forest Chronicles by Patricia C Wrede – Like Tamora Pierce, Wrede gives us wonderful female characters (but with dragons!) who are smart and witty and great fun to read. Great to hook the young people in your life on the genre.
  10. Eon/Eona by Alison Goodman – I loved these when they first came out (initially the first book was titled The Two Pearls of Wisdom) and still recommend them to people but I really need a reread, it’s been a while.
  11. Farseer trilogy (and all related books) by Robin Hobb – The Farseer trilogy is just the beginning of the story in Robin Hobb’s world. I love all of them and am delighted to still see the same quality in the newest books as in the early ones.
  12. Gina Champion Mysteries by Kim Wilkins – I love a lot of Wilkins’ adult novels but her work for younger readers is how I first discovered her and the Gina Champion books are criminally underread.
  13. The Glamourist Histories by Mary Robinette Kowal – beautiful alternate history with beautifully drawn characters and situations.
  14. Graceling Realm books by Kristin Cashore – Bitterblue was perhaps my favourite book of the year it came out, and I love the way the three work together without being a technically consecutive fantasy series.
  15. Indexing by Seanan McGuire – Seanan McGuire and her alter ego Mira Grant have written many of my favourite books from the past few years, but of her (urban) fantasies, I think this is my favourite series so far, though I love Velveteen and her traditionally published ones, too.
  16. The Keepers trilogy by Lian Tanner – Multi-award winning and deservedly so, even though this series is aimed at younger readers it is excellent reading for any age.
  17. The Last T’en series by Rowena Cory Daniells – I think this might have been the first series I bought at a science fiction convention, way back in 2002, and I loved it – Daniells writes dark and nasty fantasy, and she writes it well.
  18. Lumatere Chronicles by Melina Marchetta – I didn’t expect to like this series, and to be honest, I didn’t love the first book, which seemed a little generic, but the second and third were astonishingly good and the character of Quintana is one of the best I’ve read.
  19. Memoirs of Lady Trent series by Marie Brennan – Another recent discovery, another alternate history with (a very different kind of) dragons. I adore the style of this one, and the lead character, Lady Trent, is excellent.
  20. Mercy Thompson series by Patricia Briggs – Still one of my favourite in the urban fantasy field – Briggs writes good.
  21. The Parasol Protectorate series by Gail Carriger – fabulous fun and seriously good. Banterrific dialogue and solid storytelling come together to create great reads.
  22. Phèdre’s Trilogy by Jacqueline Carey – Another on my “must reread” list – the Kushiel books are dark and twisty and racy, and populate a world I love when I’m immersed in it. Not for the fainthearted…
  23. Raksura books by Martha Wells – I’m quite bewildered that I only discovered Wells a couple of years ago, when she’s been writing brilliant books for ages. I found her, and binged her entire backlist in a matter of weeks, starting with the Raksura, but they are all great.
  24. Rogue Agent books by KE Mills – I could have chosen other books by Karen Miller (KE Mills) but these ones are a lot of fun to read, with her steady hand on the wheel to make them solidly good books.
  25. Song of the Lioness quartet by Tamora Pierce – Possibly my earliest fantasy novels, and still awesome. Seriously, just read them.
  26. Tales of the Otori by Lian Hearn – Bordering on being not-quite fantasy but they totally are. I read the prequel, Heaven’s Net is Wide, before the previously published series proper, and promptly tracked down and devoured the lot. Beautifully written.
  27. Temeraire series by Naomi Novik – Oh look, one I agree with from the original post! I only discovered Temeraire last year, and have just recently finished the final book. I’m a bit of an alternate history fan so throw in dragons and you had me at hello…
  28. Watergivers trilogy by Glenda Larke – Recently awarded the Sara Douglass Book Series Award and deservedly so. Amazing worldbuilding, wonderful characters, and the trademark Larke brilliance.
  29. The Witches of Eileanan by Kate Forsyth – It’s been a goodly while since I read these ones but they were in my early “read all the Australian fantasy I can get my hands on” phase and have survived several book purges. Must reread…
  30. World of the Five Gods series by Lois McMaster Bujold – Most recently I’ve been reading the Penric novellas set in this world, but it was very odd I only read the original Chalion books last year. Apparently I had them conflated in my head with Bujold’s other fantasy series, so it was a great delight to read and love these ones too.

What’s that you say? There are no men on this list? Oh. Huh. Well, I guess if I tried a little harder, I could probably come up with a bunch of male names to add, because I do, on occasion, enjoy the odd book by a man, but you know what? I think I’d rather let the list stand as evidence that oh look, ladies do indeed write awesome fantasy series and you should totally read some of them. Go on, it’s fun…

So, what would you have on YOUR list? Let me know in the comments!

 

 

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Eddings reread: The Tamuli trilogy

Because we just don’t have enough to do, Alex, Joanne and I have decided to re-read The Elenium and The Tamuli trilogies by David (and Leigh) Eddings, and – partly to justify that, partly because it’s fun to compare notes – we’re blogging a conversation about each book. We respond to each other in the post itself, but you can find Alex’s post over here and Jo’s post here if you’d like to read the conversation going on in the comments. Also, there are spoilers!

Our review of The Diamond Throne (Elenium 1) is here.

Our review of The Ruby Knight (Elenium 2) is here.

Our review of The Sapphire Rose (Elenium 3) is here.

tamuliALEX:

Dear readers,

Here’s an interesting thing. We’ve been writing these reviews in a Google document. This one, entitled Domes of Fire, has existed for a few months without anything being written in it. This is despite the fact that I think we would all have said that we enjoyed the second trilogy a lot, if not as much as the first, and that we all devoured the second trilogy on this re-read just like we did the first.

TEHANI:

Aw Alex. You don’t think all of us being crazy busy had anything to do with it? 🙂

ALEX:

It’s just that…well, there’s not really that much to say. We said most of it with the first trilogy, and the reality is that this second set, the Tamuli, is basically a reworking of the first.

TEHANI:

Heh, I like that Eddings pretty much acknowledges that about halfway through The Shining City:

“It has a sort of familiar ring to it, doesn’t it Sparhawk?” Kalten said with a tight grin. “Didn’t Martel – and Annias – have the same sort of notion?”

“Oh my goodness, yes,” Ehlana agreed. “I feel as if I’ve lived through all of this before.”

JO:

One will not point out similarities to the Belgariad either. Or the Mallorean. One will not.

ALEX:

Almost identical set of people, very similar set up – except just like any sequel, things are More Impressive and More Worse. Not just a puny god, but a serious one! Bhelliom’s not just an object but an imprisoned eternal spirit! Sparhawk is Amazing!!

…ok that one’s not that new.

What follows therefore is a general discussion of the entirety of the Tamuli – what we liked, what disappointed us, etc.

TEHANI:

I think part of the problem was that once we started reading, we just couldn’t stop – having glommed all six books in such short order made it super hard to separate this batch into separate reviews! So this one giant piece is a much more sensible idea.

JO:

Oh that’s absolutely it! I read all six in this big BINGE…and then you wanted me to sit down and be sensible about each one? Can’t I just say ‘yay’ Sparhawk? Also where are my notes…?

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Eddings Reread: The Sapphire Rose (Elenium 3)

Because we just don’t have enough to do, Alex, Joanne and I have decided to re-read The Elenium and The Tamuli trilogies by David (and Leigh) Eddings, and – partly to justify that, partly because it’s fun to compare notes – we’re blogging a conversation about each book. We respond to each other in the post itself, but you can find Alex’s post over here and Jo’s post here if you’d like to read the conversation going on in the comments. Also, there are spoilers!

Our review of The Diamond Throne (Elenium 1) is here.

Our review of The Ruby Knight (Elenium 2) is here.

ALEX:

Almost the very first page of this book has an Author’s Note, which says that the wife wants to write the dedication. And “since she’s responsible for much of the work,” he’s going to let her. Why don’t you just acknowledge the co-authorship, DUDE?

JO:

I don’t see the ‘David Eddings’ on the covers any more. In my mind, it’s ‘David and Leigh’ 🙂

TEHANI:

Of course, when I first read these I had no idea, but since finding out, it’s been an annoyance every time I picked up one of the books.

Also, I think this is the first of the books where we see a really intrusive breaking of the fourth wall by the author/s? For example:

The appearance of the detachment at the gate was, in Preceptor – ah, shall we say instead Patriarch – Darellon’s words, disgraceful. (p. 155 of my version).

ALEX:

The descriptions of Ehlana, who gets cured of the poison in this book, are beyond horrid. There’s “overpowering femininity,” and women being “notoriously adept” at recognising things like a ring being an engagement ring (did I miss that seminar? How DO you tell that a ring is an engagement ring? How do I know whether I’ve been stooged?). Ehlana is unbearable smug about “netting” Sparhawk. I will admit that the point about wavering between wanting to flaunt her “womanly attributes” and wanting to hide them is fair – and even perceptive – but it’s surrounded by so much URGH. And I’d like to say that I, for one, am glad that Sparhawk tried to get out of their marriage. I know that 17 years’ difference doesn’t HAVE to be a barrier, but there is SUCH a difference between the two of them.

TEHANI:

By the end of this book, I was starting to get an uncomfortable feeling about the number of very young girls who become obsessed with older men. And Aphrael’s manipulation with kisses is most disturbing!

JO:

Oh yes that’s definitely a thing in these books.

ALEX:

Urgh.

 

JO:

And we meet Mirtai! Isn’t she an interesting character? Super-strong, super-warrior who is quite happy to be a slave. In fact, she insists on it.

TEHANI:

the_elenium__ehlana_and_mirtai_by_opheliawasmyname-d5vm3dt

Ehlana & Mirtai fan art by Deviant artist OpheliaWasMyName

Mirtai is such a contradiction! Not always deliberately on the author’s part, I think… This bit really got up my nose on this reread though:

Mirtai’s skin had a peculiarly exotic bronze tinge to it, and her braided hair was glossy black. In a woman of normal size, her features would have been considered beautiful, and her dark eyes, slightly upturned at the corners, ravishing. Mirtai, however, was not of normal size. (p. 324 of my version)

SO. MUCH. WRONG. To begin, what the heck is “normal size”? And the “exotic” bronze tinge of skin and “slightly upturned eyes”? ARGH!

JO:
I should probably leave this discussion for Domes of Fire, because there’s not much Mirtai in The Sapphire Rose.

ALEX:

Jo – indeed – but yes, that exoticising is repellant. And the whole ‘normal size’ thing makes me cross-eyed.

In the last book there was the issue of being ‘misshapen’. I couldn’t help but notice that in this one, when the Pandions are being domineering of the Elenian council, there’s the pederast Baron and Lenda and “the fat man”. Does the fat man ever get named? Fat isn’t entirely an evil thing like deformity is, in these books – Platime is fat but approaches genius-ness on the council, Patriarch Emban is very clever, and both of them are good – but it’s still always mentioned. There’s barely a reference to Emban without mention of his belly. And he uses that sometimes – to defuse tension, for instance – but I’m still not entirely comfortable with it.

TEHANI:

That’s interesting though, because both Platime and Emban are important, good characters – not presented as useless or bad people, and so I guess I read that as subverting the trope? Although there is Otha…

JO:

Even though Platime and Emban are good and important characters, their ‘fatness’ is mentioned a lot. Like it’s a personality trait.

TEHANI:

Very true.

ALEX:

Speaking of the council, I would like to declare my sympathy for Lycheas. He’s a dimwit and a pawn, but surely he deserves sympathy.

TEHANI:

Oh, I disagree! He’s not very bright and he’s been led astray I accept, but I think he knew he was doing wrong, and there were times he could have chosen another path. He was as hungry for power as the rest of them!

ALEX:

Hmm. Perhaps. How much choice did he have with a mother like that probably poisoning him from the start? (If we accept the premise of the story.) … oh wait, does that shoot my theory down, at least somewhat, given that is probably exactly the reason why he’s hungry for power? Dang.

JO:

I think the Eddings set him up to be disliked, and he simply has no say in the matter. He’s always portrayed as snivelling and pathetic and stupid. He may or may not be hungry for power, it doesn’t matter. He’s there to be a lesser baddy that everyone can look down on and routinely threaten to kill.

ALEX:

You’re saying he’s just a narrative device? SAY IT AINT SO.

A rather chilling part of this novel is the utter lack of regard for the civilians in Chyrellos, during the siege. It was really quite unpleasant reading.

JO:

I find the siege so boring I have to say that never really bothered me. The scene that does stick in my mind is when Sparhawk and an unnamed soldier witness a woman dragged into an alley and quite obviously raped (though thankfully off camera). The soldier, crying because she ‘could have been his sister’ shoots the rapist. But then the woman staggers out of the alley, sees her not-quite-dead rapist, takes his dagger and violently finishes the job and steals his loot. The soldier ‘retches’ and Sparhawk says “Nobody’s very civilised in those circumstances”.

This scene was always a WTF moment for me. When you consider Sparhawk’s career, what about her actions make them ‘uncivilised’, exactly? He does much worse things to people and is rewarded for them! Is it because she’s a woman? Or because she’s not a Church Knight and it’s okay when they do it. Or because she took the loot? I mean, seriously…?

ALEX:

Yes!! This!! I was so ANGRY at that reaction from the men – who are safe on so many levels from this sort of thing – getting all uppity about her taking revenge. I don’t like her doing it either, but I don’t like the initial rape even more.

I cried at Kurik’s funeral. Not at his death – that all happened too fast, I think – but when I got to the funeral…well, I was glad to be by myself. However, I am still suspicious of the idea of Aslade being quite so accommodating of Elys.

JO:

Kurik *sniff* 😦

TEHANI:

And you know, none of that business really makes sense. Kurik is portrayed as steadfast, loyal, moral and really quite upright (even uptight?), so the fact he cheated on Aslade (and their four sons, essentially) is, well, just a bit weird. It was a useful way to have Talen important to the group, I guess, but the character path is very odd.

ALEX:

YES. Also it makes adultery completely fine, which… I know there are other ways of doing relationships than ‘conventional’ monogamy, etc etc, but not within THIS world’s framework – everyone else who does that is regarded severely. Whereas Sparhawk etc are all, “dude, no worries! Everyone sleeps around sometime, the wimmens is so attractive we can’t help it!”

JO:

YES from me too. Never felt right to me for exactly those reasons.

TEHANI:

I do like the way the Kurik’s sons talk about their “mothers” in the later books though. That said, remembering I read the Tamuli trilogy first, I was quite certain Aslade and Elys had been both married to Kurik, the way they are referred to there!

JO:

Heh yes. I can imagine. Although I was always proud of Aslade and Elys for being able to put aside their potential conflict and just get on with life. So often the relationships between women are portrayed as bitchy, jealous, spiteful things. And usually its over the attention of a man. So I appreciate that they went down the opposite path.

Actually, in the Tamuli there are a lot more examples of strong female friendship too.

TEHANI:

Some more perpetuation of stereotypes here, too. In this case, the temper of the red-head:

In Delada’s case all the cliches about red-haired people seemed to apply. (p. 282 of my version).

JO:

Yeah I thought they got a little carried away with that!

TEHANI:

And what the heck is this bit of elitism? Stragen says, Whores and thieves aren’t really very stimulating companions… (p. 410 of my version). Um, well Talen and Platime AND HIMSELF are thieves and all presented as quite stimulating! The whores get a poorer presentation, but still!

ALEX:

That bit also made me very cranky. Again with the superior attitude.

TEHANI:

And this awful bit of Ehlana characterisation:

“Would you all mind too terribly much?” Ehlana asked them in a little-girl sort of voice.

YUCK! The woman is a queen, and fully in command of herself and the power she wields, yet she resorts to that (for no reason, anyway!)?! No! We talked a bit about this in one of the earlier reviews, how the women themselves are supposed to be powerful, and there are quite a lot of them, which is nice, but the actual presentation of them really undermines this at times.

JO:

Yes! This is what’s been irritating me the whole time, and it only gets worse as the series goes on. Doesn’t matter how strong a woman is, she still resorts to hissy fits and theatrics or childishness to either get what she wants, or basically keep control of the ‘relationship’. Even Sephrenia does it in the later books! It just feels to me like the books believe that deep down, women are irrational children. OR that they will resort to acting like them as a way of keeping their men in line.

JO:

Am I the only one who finds Ehlana’s speech to the council a little…difficult to believe. All these supposedly hardened politicians/Patriarchs completely suckered in by her ‘divinely inspired’ speech? Just because she’s pretty, or something? And because she ‘fainted’?

TEHANI:

I have such a different view of the Patriarchs to you! I always read ANY of those political gatherings as being a bunch of little boys just grabbing for power, none of the “hardened” politicians at all! In fact, Eddings seems to have very little respect for political systems at all. They’re all corrupt or useless!

ALEX:

I don’t think they’re MEANT to look like that, but they sometimes do – and it’s another thing that annoys me about the Eddings portrayal of religion, because it’s JUST another instance of politics and again there’s so much uselessness and cunning and unpleasantness. Also, Ehlana manipulates them, and I think it manages to make her look silly – conniving and dangerous with the using feminine things in dangerous ways – AND it makes the Patriarchs look silly for falling for such obvious, feminine strategies. Way to go for insulting two groups there!

JO:

Last time I said that I found The Ruby Knight a lot faster-paced and more enjoyable than I remembered. I have to say the opposite for The Sapphire Rose. Oh god I was so sick of the siege by the time it ended, and it seemed to take forever to get to Zemoch. It felt like so much padding. Just destroy Azash already!

TEHANI:

Some excellent examples of Faran the human horse again:

Faran made a special point of grinding his steel-shod hooves into a number of very sensitive places on the officer’s body.

“Feel better now?” Sparhawk asked his horse.

Faran nickered wickedly. (p. 155 my version)

JO:

I could summarise the plot again but you probably don’t want me to do that this time!

They cure Ehlana. She’s all grown up now and in love with Sparhawk. They ‘accidently’ get engaged. Off to Chyrellos to stop Annias being elected Archprelate. There’s a siege which goes on forever. Then Wargun and Ehlana turn up and the siege is over. Ehlana and Sparhawk get married. They go to Zemoch with Bhelloim to kill Azash. It takes forever. They get to Zemoch. Kurik dies. Martel dies. Otha and Annias die. Azash dies. Lycheas dies. Arissa kills herself. They return to Cimmura. Everything’s peaceful, but kinda crappy, because the gods are shell-shocked by Azash’s death. Danae happens. Eventually, Aphrael and everyone go on holidays and spring returns.

ALEX:

Nice work there, Jo. I would add: Sparhawk and Ehlana get married in the same way that a person might buy a horse; Martel dies but everyone’s real sad, because actually he was decent and just led astray, y’know? And “Danae happens” means that a goddess is incarnate in a different racial family and that’s really kinda cool.

JO:

Heh, that’s awesome.

Image by Deviant artist Bowie-Spawan

Fan art of young Martel & Sparhawk by Deviant artist Bowie-Spawan

TEHANI:

Well, we’ve picked a lot of nits in the Elenium books, but final verdict on the first three? For me, I have to admit I still thoroughly enjoyed reading them, with grins and tears throughout, and the comfy blanket feeling of an old favourite that still (mostly) holds up. Although there were definitely a lot more grimaces at the rough patches than when I was younger!

ALEX:

I think I feel basically the same as you, Tehani. It really is a warm comfy blanket… with moth holes and a few scratchy bits… but a lot of love and memories holding it together.

JO:

Couldn’t agree more! I might snipe at them, but I still love these books and rereading them has been thoroughly comforting. It also reminds me what I love about reading and writing in the first place. It’s just so much fun!

 

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Eddings Reread: The Ruby Knight (Elenium 2)

Because we just don’t have enough to do, Alex, Joanne and I have decided to re-read The Elenium and The Tamuli trilogies by David (and Leigh) Eddings, and – partly to justify that, partly because it’s fun to compare notes – we’re blogging a conversation about each book. We respond to each other in the post itself, but you can find Alex’s post over here and Jo’s post here if you’d like to read the conversation going on in the comments. Also, there are spoilers!

Our review of The Diamond Throne (Elenium 1) is here.

Ruby_KnightALEX:

Sparhawk starts this book a) immediately after the end of the first one, and b) wanting someone to jump him, so that he can get all violent on some unsuspecting footpad. I don’t think I was really paying attention to that sort of thing when I was a teen. He’s actually not a very nice man a lot of the time, and that makes me sad.

JO:

It is a bit sad isn’t it 😦 Sparhawk’s most common reaction seems to be violence, and the narrative and tone celebrates that part of him.

TEHANI:

Alex, you say “not a very nice man” but I never read it that way (and still don’t, I guess!) – he’s a product of his culture and his time. They seem to quite happily wreak havoc on people at the drop of a hat, and he IS a knight, trained to battle!

ALEX:

OK, maybe I don’t have to be quite so sad about him – that he’s a product of his time – but still his active desire for violence does act, for me now, against my lionising of him as a teenager. He is flawed, and I’m troubled because Jo is exactly right – the narrative celebrates him and his anger/violent tendencies.

TEHANI:

You’re both completely right. I still choose to read it in the context of the book, AND STICK MY HEAD IN THE SAND. Damn. That’s the problem with rereading with a few more brains behind us, isn’t it?! Continue reading

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Eddings Reread: The Diamond Throne (Elenium 1)

Because we just don’t have enough to do, Alex, Joanne and I have decided to re-read The Elenium and The Tamuli trilogies by David (and Leigh) Eddings, and – partly to justify that, partly because it’s fun to compare notes – we’re blogging a conversation about each book. We respond to each other in the post itself, but you can find Alex’s post over here and Jo’s post here if you’d like to read the conversation going on in the comments. Also, there are spoilers!

Diamond_ThroneTEHANI:

I was feeling a little book-weary yesterday so thought I might as well start my reading for this conversational review series, given it’s usually a soothing experience. Within a single PAGE, I was reaching for Twitter, because SO MUCH of the book cried out to be tweeted! Great one-liners, the introduction of favourite characters, and, sadly, some of the not so awesome bits as well. I was having a grand time pulling out 140 character lines (#EddingsReread if you’re interested), but the response from the ether was amazing! So many people hold these books firmly in their reading history, and it was just lovely to hear their instant nostalgia.

ALEX:

And I read those tweets and everything was SO FAMILIAR that I immediately started reading as well. And finished a day later.

JO:

Ok. A) You people read too quickly! B) Tehani those tweets were enough to start me feeling all nostalgic. I was in the middle of cooking dinner and had to put everything down, run upstairs and dig the books out of their box hidden in the back of the wardrobe. Continue reading

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